The Listeners' Club

The Listeners' Club is a English-speaking blog specialized in the field of classical music and opera. As such, The Listeners' Club is a qualified source of soClassiQ, like Norman Lebrecht - Slipped disc or Naxos Blog and many others. The oldest article indexed by soClassiQ is dated 2018-01-03. Since then, a total of 424 articles have been written and published by The Listeners' Club.

The Listeners' Club blog activity

With 41 articles published in the last 90 days, The Listeners' Club is currently a quite active news source. "Quite active" does not mean that The Listeners' Club is less interesting than another more prolific source or more interesting than a less dynamic source. Each blog follows a specific editorial line, publishing according to its own rhythm.

This editorial activity is no different from that recorded for the previous period.

The last article in The Listeners' Club, "Sibelius’ Third Symphony: Classical and Austere", is dated 2020-08-12. By 2019, this source had published 157 articles (108 since the beginning of 2020). Over the past 12 months, The Listeners' Club has published an average of 14 articles per month.

The Listeners' Club in the last 36 months

Weekly publications:

2018
2019
2020
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 The Listeners' Club  All indexed sources

The Listeners' Club has been selected by soClassiQ to be among its qualified sources because we believe that its articles fully contribute to the knowledge of classical music and opera. Because it is up to everyone to make their own opinion, to love The Listeners' Club or to prefer other writings, all our visitors and members are invited to discover The Listeners' Club. If you like it, feel free to add it to your browser bookmarks or soClassiQ bookmarks (for its members, with the button below). This will allow you to come back to it easily and regularly.

The latest articles from The Listeners' Club

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The Listeners' Club

2020-08-12 04:14:19

Sibelius’ Third Symphony: Classical and Austere 

Sibelius’ Third Symphony: Classical and Austere

Jean Sibelius’ music is filled with the magic and mystery of ancient northern woods. It can be simultaneously icy, brusk, brooding, austere, and eternally soulful. Often, it unfolds in a way which feels static and circular, seemingly influenced by Finland’s land of the midnight sun, where the cycle of day and night is replaced by extended periods of light alternating with darkness and gloom. Similar circular, repeating phrases can be found throughout Finnish folk ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-08-10 06:00:55

“If Ye Love Me”: Thomas Tallis’ Timeless Motet 

“If Ye Love Me”: Thomas Tallis’ Timeless Motet

Politics and dogma leave their temporary mark on the shifting sands of history, while music remains eternal. The life of the great English composer Thomas Tallis (c. 1505-1585) is a testament to this idea. While Tallis remained an “unreformed Roman Catholic” throughout his life, he adapted professionally to serve the monarch of the time. He wrote for the Latin Catholic Mass until Henry VIII’s break with Rome. After writing Anglican music, he ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-08-07 06:00:04

Jerome Kern’s “All the Things You Are,” Leon Fleisher 

Jerome Kern’s “All the Things You Are,” Leon Fleisher

In January we explored Jerome Kern’s extraordinary 1939 ballad, All the Things You Are. It’s one of the most beautiful and harmonically sophisticated songs to come out of the Broadway theater. Allusive and dreamy, it’s a melody which floats from one key to another, taking a magical journey part way around the circle of fifths through a series of continuous modulations. The late Leon Fleisher included his version of All the Things You Are on a 2014 Grammy nominated ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-08-05 06:00:42

Remembering Leon Fleisher: Three Legendary Recordings 

Remembering Leon Fleisher: Three Legendary Recordings

Leon Fleisher, the eminent American pianist, passed away last Sunday in Baltimore following a battle with cancer. He was 92. Born in San Francisco, Fleisher made his Carnegie Hall debut at the age of 16 with Pierre Monteux and the New York Philharmonic. He performed Brahms’ First Piano Concerto, a work which would later become a signature part of his repertoire. At 23, he became the first American to win the Queen Elisabeth ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-08-03 06:00:16

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto: Perlman, Barenboim, and the Berlin Philharmonic (1992 Live Performance) 

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto: Perlman, Barenboim, and the Berlin Philharmonic (1992 Live Performance)

It’s one of the great monuments of the violin repertoire—the Concerto that set the standard for all others that followed. Yet, Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D Major was not received particularly well when it was premiered at Vienna’s Theater an der Wien on December 23, 1806. It’s believed that Beethoven finished parts of the score so late that the soloist, Franz Clement, may have been sight-reading some passages in the concert. Additionally, ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-07-31 06:00:38

Elgar’s “Chanson de Matin”: Sunshine and Flowers 

Elgar’s “Chanson de Matin”: Sunshine and Flowers

This week, we have explored music of the English composer Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934), from the blazing orchestral virtuosity of In the South, to the youthful charm of the Serenade for Strings. We’ll finish the week with a brief and breezy aubade—music which suggests the cheerful innocence of pastoral flowers catching the first light of dawn. Chanson de Matin (“Morning Song”) is the sunny companion to the more melancholy Chanson de Nuit. Published as Op. 15, No. 1 and ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-07-29 06:00:33

Elgar’s Serenade for Strings: Music of Youth 

Elgar’s Serenade for Strings: Music of Youth

Composed in March of 1892, the Serenade for Strings is one of the earliest works of Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934). It may have been a reworking of a previously written suite. It is the music of spring, filled with youthful vitality and charm. By definition, the title “serenade” suggests music played in the evening, outdoors amid the beauty and abundance of nature. As depicted in Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, it also conjures up images ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-07-27 06:00:10

Elgar’s “In the South (Alassio)”: Music from “The Garden of the World” 

Elgar’s “In the South (Alassio)”: Music from “The Garden of the World”

From Mendelssohn and Tchaikovsky to Richard Strauss, the sunny climate of Italy has been a source of inspiration for numerous composers on holiday. One of the most significant examples is Sir Edward Elgar’s blazing 1904 orchestral tone poem, In the South (Alassio), Op. 50. In November, 1903 Elgar and his wife traveled to the Italian Riviera where they planned to spend the winter. The composer was exhausted and needed to recuperate after ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-07-24 06:00:33

Handel’s Oboe Sonata in F Major, HĂ©loĂŻse Gaillard and Ensemble Amarillis 

Handel’s Oboe Sonata in F Major, Héloïse Gaillard and Ensemble Amarillis

Handel’s Oboe Sonata in F Major, HWV 363a unfolds as a vibrant musical dialogue between the solo voice and the accompanying basso continuo. Its five movements alternate in tempo between slow and fast, suggesting the Italian church sonatas of Arcangelo Corelli. The opening movement (Adagio) is both majestic and lamenting. Its expansive, singing melody might remind you of an aria from one of Handel’s operas or oratorios. The second movement (Allegro) erupts with ...

The Listeners' Club

2020-07-22 06:00:17

MiklĂłs RĂłzsa: Seven Great Film Scores 

MiklĂłs RĂłzsa: Seven Great Film Scores

Beginning in the 1930s and 40s, the soaring, majestic sound we associate with the golden age of Hollywood films was created largely by Eastern European emigres—composers such as Erich Wolfgang Korngold, Franz Waxman and Max Steiner. Another significant name from this list is the Hungarian-born Miklós Rózsa (1907-1995), who wrote scores for nearly 100 films between 1937 and 1982, earning 17 Oscar nominations. Rózsa’s introduction to film scoring came in 1934 during a ...

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